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Hello everyone, I just wanted to announce that this music studies blog is moving over to Wordpress!

If you would like to unfollow this blog, feel free to, as there is a chance I may delete this one at some point. But if you liked this blog please do keep up with it on its new Wordpress home!

Missy’s Favorite Picks for the 2014 Grammy Awards

Best Pop Vocal Album: Justin Timberlake’s The 20/20 Experience — The Complete Experience

Best R&B Song: “Pusher Love Girl” by Justin Timberlake

Best Jazz Vocal Album: Cecile McLorin Salvant’s WomanChild

Best Musical Theatre Album: I love all the nominees, honestly. If I really had to pick my favorite of the three is probably Motown: The Musical but I think Kinky Boots is most deserving.

Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalists: “Swing Low” arranged by Gil Goldstein, performed by Bobby McFerrin & Esperanza Spalding

Missy’s Top 5 Favorite Albums of 2013

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The Boston Globe: What the jazz discographers knewBruce Epperson on the list-making amateurs who shaped how we understand the music — by Noah Guiney

For anyone interested in jazz, there’s the live music, there’s the recordings, and—if you want to go way deeper—there are thousands of pages of books documenting early jazz recordings, lovingly cataloged.
The existence of these books is no small thing. In its early days, the jazz recording business was disorganized bordering on piratical: Copyright law was poorly enforced; a small label that got its hands on someone else’s master tapes might just pass off the music of one artist as that of another. A listener could be hearing a small-town dance hall band on a record purporting to be the latest from Louis Armstrong.
Enter a small group of obsessives: amateur jazz discographers. Working mainly in England and France after World War II, this small cadre of men would hunt through used record shops, scanning serial numbers and examining tiny details to figure out when the record was recorded and which musicians were really playing on it. They produced immense catalogs of jazz records that for the first time authoritatively sorted genuine from false.

The Boston Globe: What the jazz discographers knew
Bruce Epperson on the list-making amateurs who shaped how we understand the music — by Noah Guiney

For anyone interested in jazz, there’s the live music, there’s the recordings, and—if you want to go way deeper—there are thousands of pages of books documenting early jazz recordings, lovingly cataloged.

The existence of these books is no small thing. In its early days, the jazz recording business was disorganized bordering on piratical: Copyright law was poorly enforced; a small label that got its hands on someone else’s master tapes might just pass off the music of one artist as that of another. A listener could be hearing a small-town dance hall band on a record purporting to be the latest from Louis Armstrong.

Enter a small group of obsessives: amateur jazz discographers. Working mainly in England and France after World War II, this small cadre of men would hunt through used record shops, scanning serial numbers and examining tiny details to figure out when the record was recorded and which musicians were really playing on it. They produced immense catalogs of jazz records that for the first time authoritatively sorted genuine from false.

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teschology:

Out of the Dawn | Buddy Clark’s Orchestra
A newly-discovered possible Frank Teschemacher recording

Recorded in New York for Brunswick on November 24, 1928, this rare side was recently discovered by Kurt Weisbecker and it is thought that Frank Teschemacher is present on the record due to the very Teschemacher-like clarinet solo starting at 1:22. (This record is not to be confused with a previous recording of “Out of the Dawn” recorded on September 28th, with the Dorsey brothers and Frank Teschemacher definitely present; this is a completely different recording)

Here is Weisbecker’s argument as to why the solo indicates that Frank Teschemacher is the clarinetist:

The soloist here is playing it pretty straight. What makes this a difficult identification is that we have no other known example of Tesch playing a subdued, close to the vest, “blinders on” solo. We are used to hearing him blowtorch his way through melodies. The soloist here does nothing of the kind, yet plays with a phrasing and tonality (playing to the sharp side of things), as Brad Kay has noted, reminiscent of Tesch. […]

This soloist almost squeaks at the beginning of this solo, during a fill-in between measures of the song, and actually does squeak towards the end in the same spot between measures. The presence of these squeaks, both in the same place musically and also on the downbeat indicates to me a presence of style as opposed to a bad reed or a mistake.

Many have argued that the clarinetist could simply be Jimmy Dorsey directly emulating the Chicago-style but Weisbecker counter-argues that by saying that even on other recordings when Dorsey emulates the Chicago-style, his playing is still clean and we never hear anything close to the squeaks and sharp tonality exhibited here.

Considering Teschemacher arrived in New York in mid-June, stayed there for roughly 5 months, and there is no concrete evidence of Teschemacher being back in Chicago until he appears on a Chicago recording session on December 17th, it is entirely possible that he could have been around to make this recording.

classicbluenotes:

Celebrating Women in Jazz Day — May 10

Pictured here: Lil Hardin-Armstrong, Valaida Snow, Blanche Calloway, Mary Lou Williams, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Roz Cron, Clora Bryant, Lee Wiley, Sarah Vaughan, a few members of The International Sweethearts of Rhythm, Marian McPartland, Cassandra Wilson, Terri Lyne Carrington, Melody Gardot, Esperanza Spalding.

To celebrate the acclaimed documentary The Girls in the Band coming to Lincoln Center, New York mayor Michael Bloomberg has proclaimed Friday, May 10 “Women in Jazz Day.” The date celebrates the legacies of female jazz musicians and marks the first in a weeklong series of screenings of The Girls in the Band at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center at Lincoln Center.

Source // Learn more about The Girls In The Band

The End of the Golden Age of Chicago-Style Jazz

It was a music very characteristic of its time, forever preserving the sound of Jazz Age Chicago on shellac records. But the Jazz Age could not live forever and Chicago’s role in the development of jazz could not always keep stranglehold of its power on the music. Jazz, especially, is a music that always moves, always evolves. And when the music moves on, it takes on a new form, it transforms into something new and something more timely for the new era.

And while it is a simple fact that change is inevitable and that pop culture will always shapeshift to better fit the times, this common fact of nature is not the lone force that brought the demise of Chicago-style jazz. Rather, alongside this natural change there were specific factors, societal and musical, that contributed to the fall of the Chicago-style and the rise of swing.

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Jazz Appreciation Month — Jazz birthdays in the month of April
Duke Ellington, born April 29, 1899

Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington is a legendary figure in jazz history — and rightfully so. As a composer, pianist, and bandleader, Ellington’s contributions to jazz were immense and he is credited for elevating the public’s perception of jazz music to that of an art music. His career spanned over 50 years, and included leading his unique orchestras, writing over 1000 compositions in a broad variety of styles, scoring for movies, composing stage musicals, and going on world tours. Several of his compositions have become jazz standards. He was awarded with a number of honors, including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, an Honorary PhD from Berklee College of Music, the Legion of Honor by the country of France, and a posthumous Pulitzer Prize.
Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974 at age 75 from lung cancer and pneumonia.

Jazz Appreciation MonthJazz birthdays in the month of April

Duke Ellington, born April 29, 1899

Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington is a legendary figure in jazz history — and rightfully so. As a composer, pianist, and bandleader, Ellington’s contributions to jazz were immense and he is credited for elevating the public’s perception of jazz music to that of an art music. His career spanned over 50 years, and included leading his unique orchestras, writing over 1000 compositions in a broad variety of styles, scoring for movies, composing stage musicals, and going on world tours. Several of his compositions have become jazz standards. He was awarded with a number of honors, including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, an Honorary PhD from Berklee College of Music, the Legion of Honor by the country of France, and a posthumous Pulitzer Prize.

Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974 at age 75 from lung cancer and pneumonia.

I know I'm very late, but I finally got around to reading all of your Jazz/Hip-Hop piece and your recent follow up. Really interesting stuff! I would love to see something longer on it at some point!

Thank you! It was something I wrote rather on a whim but I’d definitely love to expand on it later at some point, probably after studying more about the history and current scene of hip-hop and rap.

Some quick thoughts to add regarding my recent hip-hop + jazz post

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